30"  Hollow Form

 

Home
Up

 

30" American Walnut hollow form


The wood for this project came from the Walnut Avenue tree.  Pictures of and infromation about the tree the tree can be found on the Wood Collecting, Walnut Avenue page of this site.

Click on the pictures to enlarge.  

The 30" walnut hollow form started from a 48" long section of American walnut 12" more or less in cross section. I had to get the Power plainer out to shave off the knot sticking out of the lower left end.

After an hour and a half with the power plainer the blank clears the lather bed all the way around.

This is a photo of the rather out of balance blank spinning on the lathe.

I bored holes in the center of the blank at both ends for the live center and spur center. This is extra protection to keep the blank on the lathe in the event of a catch.

This photo showe the blank after it is turned round between centers. Note the pile of chips on the floor. It was almost up to my knees.

This is another photo of the blank turned round between centers. It took a weekend to get it round and mounted to the face plate.

After turning the blank round I riged it back up with the hoist so I can take out the centers and screw the face plate to the blank.

Another view of the blank suspended in air with the face plate on it.

I am only able to handle large blanks like this with the use of the Hoist and the load leveler. The hoist lifts the logs and the load leveler lets me shift the center of gravity left or right to get the blank horizontal.

After about 6 hours of turning I have the basic shape to the hollow form.

I had intended to make the hollow form 36" - 38" long. After finding a very large bark inclusion at the bottom of the turning I adjusted my expectations and settled on a 30" tall by 11-1/2" wide hollow form.

This is another view of the hollow form and the location of the bark inclusion.

Before the hollow form can be drilled out and hollowed the steady rest has to be setup. This steady rest is an original design of parts added on to 2 OneWay bowl steadies. This steady rest is the 5th iteration and the best solution I could find on a budget.

Closer view of the steady rest.

3rd view of the steady rest

View of the steady rest from the head stock end of the lathe.

Tail stock view of the steady rest

Every night after turning it is very important to put a plastic bag over the end grain of the Hollow form on the tail stock end. This keeps the wood from loosing moisture too quickly and cracking. The face plate takes care of moisture loss on the head stock end.

The next morning I drilled out the hollow form with a 2-5/16" forester drill bit. I have two 18" Kobalt forester bit extensions that let me reach right to the bottom. It is important NOT to use a drill bit with a screw center as if you use a bit with a screw center you cannot back it out. The forester bit has to have a standard drill point.

This is a view of the hollowing rig and steady rest setup with the hollow form blank. The top bar with the green blocks is a support for the laser pointer. The laser pointer is adjusted so that when the laser dot disappears from the outside of the turning you have achieved the desired wall thickness. Note the red dot on the left side of the turning between the wheels. Without the laser it is difficult to achieve a uniformed wall thickness as you are flying blind.

Close up of steady rest hollower and hollow form blank.

It took 2 weekends to rough out the inside of thehollow form to a uniform 1/2" thickness.

Another view of hollowing the turning.

Another view of hollowing the turning.

A close up of the hollowing tool going thru the opening in the top of the hollow form.

Another close up of the hollowing tool going thru the opening in the top of the hollow form.

The bar that sticks up from the hollower supports a laser. The laser dot is adjusted so that it falls off the outside of the turning when you have achieved the desired thickness.

After the turning is roughed out it has to dry for a couple of weeks. Then it is finished turned to 3/8" wall thickness.

Another view of finish turning with a large teardrop scraper.

The cutting and scraping part of turning is finished. Now the hollow form has to be sanded inside and out. This takes another weekend.

This is a photo of Ted Rudie with the 30" x 11-1/2" American walnut hollow form.

Another view of the 30" x 11-1/2" American walnut hollow form.

This is a photo of Ted Rudie with the 30" x 11-1/2" American walnut hollow form.

This is a photo of the 30" x 11-1/2" American walnut hollow form with a few cotes of varnish on it.

Home | 18" Hollow Form | 36" Hollow Form | 30"  Hollow Form